Wednesday, 29 January 2014

An article and a Story in The People's Friend Special

 
Lots to celebrate today, with an article and a short story in this month's People's Friend. Having them both in the same issue, though, isn't chance - the article 'Message from the Front' is linked to my story 'Forget Me Not'.
 
My story starts when care worker, Jade, sees an old WW1 silk postcard on old Edie's bedside table. Beside it is a photograph of a young soldier and his bride. Jade asks her about the card and so begins a tale of devotion, friendship and love... think Pearl Harbour (but for the previous war).

The illustration (shown on the right) was specially commissioned for the story by Mark Viney. Thank you Mark - you have captured the sentiment in the story so well.
 
The story was inspired by a set of WW1 silk postcards that were left to me by my Aunt Edith. They were originally in a frame but as it was broken, I took the cards out and it was then I noticed that some had some writing on the back.
 


The cards have always fascinated me and I wanted to find out more about them. The article is about the history of these cards. Originally embroidered by hand, they were produced in France and Belgium to sell as souvenirs to soldiers posted on the front. Around 10 million were made.

Some of the cards would have had a central portion cut out of them as a flap so that a tiny greeting card could be inserted in a pocket behind the silk front and the back. The cards would have cost the equivalent of 10p in today's money.

The most popular designs were military, patriotic or romantic designs.
 


If you want to read more about the origin of these postcards and how they were made, or would like to read my story, The People's Friend Special is in the shops now.



24 comments:

  1. It's fantastic artwork, Wendy, and I'm off to read your story now.
    xxPat

    ReplyDelete
  2. Oh, I'm so pleased this is out having heard the history. Can't wait to read both the story and the article. Better get to the shop right now ... Well done on a double PF whammy, Wendy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. If I remember, I'll show you the postcards next week, Tracy.

      Delete
  3. Congratulations on your double whammy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. That was a 'prompt' reply, Patsy (you'll have to read Patsy's blog post to understand this, I'm afraid).

      Delete
  4. Congratulations on both the article and the story, Wendy. I love any stories that are historically based but to have the silk postcards yourself from Aunt Edith must give the story that 'extra' something.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes it does, Jan - that's why I called the elderly lady Edie.

      Delete
  5. Congratulations. I love hearing about the inspirations for stories and this is a particularly good one! I'm sure Aunt Edith would be delighted!

    ReplyDelete
  6. You're on a roll Wendy,great news.

    ReplyDelete
  7. Congratulations on the double, Wendy! Your aunt would be so chuffed x

    ReplyDelete
  8. I'll put PF on the shopping list. I'd be interested in your article as I have several of these cards. They were tucked inside my great-grandmother's bible.
    Well done, Wendy.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. What a great place to find them, Lynne.

      Delete
  9. How wonderful, Wendy - I love the sound of the article and the story!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Rosemary. I'm just about to have a go at your 'First Draft' proofreading task in Writer's Forum.

      Delete
  10. I've never heard of these postcards: how interesting. I've got an old album of postcards that came from a great aunt (I think), and there are messages on the back of them. Maybe I should take a closer look.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Yes have a look at them and see what they're like.

      Delete
  11. Beautiful postcards, what a lovely family heirloom. We used to know someone who collected cigarette cards but these are far more interesting. Congratulations on your success with PF!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you Cara. I used to have cigarette cards as well

      Delete
  12. Hi Wendy, what I wonderful story, and so topical at the moment too. I wonder how much social history is stored in attics?

    ReplyDelete