Tuesday, 3 September 2013

The Man Behind the Mask - Read My Story in Woman's Weekly Fiction Special


Another in my 'Inspiration Behind the Story' series. I have a story in this month's Woman's Weekly Fiction Special called The Man Behind the Mask. I am very pleased as it is the story I sold them following my visit to the Woman's Weekly Fiction Workshop in June (a nice quick turnaround from penning the story to publication).

This story is unusual in that it is only 1000 words. I am much more at home writing longer fiction (often around 3000 words) but I had decided to try a short twist in the tail piece for the first time.

The inspiration for my story is something that I saw on a double decker bus on a trip to London. I would tell you what it was but if I do, any of you wanting to read the story will have the ending spoilt. As soon as I saw the 'thing', I knew exactly what I was going to write - in face I wrote it in my head while on the bus and then it was an easy step once I'd got home to type it up. This is so unlike me - I usually have no idea where my story is going to go.

Samantha Tonge on her blog says 'the brain is like any other muscle – the more you use it, the better it is at any particular function' and she is so right. The more I write the more I am finding potential stories in the things I see.

Not much inspiration to share after all but proof that stories can be found anywhere.

A tip for writing 'twist' stories: start with the ending and work backwards. (I can't believe I just said that - it's such an alien concept to me!) If you want help with writing a story with a twist, this book might help you.

16 comments:

  1. I shan't give away the ending, Wendy, but I read it last night and absolutely loved it - took me completely by surprise :-) x

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    1. I very much appreciate that, Teresa - thank you so much. Now you know what it was I saw and why I couldn't really say too much about this story's inspiration. Look forward to settling down with a cup of coffee and reading yours.

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  2. Congratulations honey! Hopefully getting my copy today :)

    xx

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  3. Nice one, Wendy! Twist tales are incredibly difficult to write so well done for getting this one in WW post the workshop.

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  4. Ooh, I'm so curious what you saw on the bus - off to buy a copy :-)

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    1. A bus is a good place for spying and eavesdropping too, Mandy!

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  5. Must read it now you've got me interested. Congratulations on the sale.

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  6. Great to hear of your quick acceptance, Wendy! I'll try and get a copy today - I'm intrigued.

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    1. Yes, that story was a bit whirlwind, Rosemary - not usual, I can assure you!

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  7. I used to love writing twist-in-the-tale's, Wendy, but haven't for a long time. Plus all my stories used to stay around 1000 words, but over the last year they have got longer and longer - nothing stays the same.

    Well done on the sale!

    Sam Tonge

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    1. I'm with your there, Sam. I now consider a 2000 word story to be short!

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